Tag Archives: goals

7 Ways to Control Your Small Business’s Overhead Costs

Whether you’ve just launched a startup or have been in business for years, it’s critical to control your company’s overhead costs. Overhead expenses, the fixed costs (rent, insurance, etc.) of operating your business, have a tremendous impact on your bottom line. How effectively you manage them can mean the difference between profitability and extinction.

It pays to carefully review what you’re spending on overhead and find ways to reduce those costs. Not sure where to start? Consider the following ideas:

7 Tips for Trimming the Fat From Your Small Business’s Overhead Expenses

1. Explore sharing marketing costs with complementary businesses in your local area.

Brainstorm ideas with fellow entrepreneurs about how you can cross-promote each other and get exposure through collective efforts.

For example, a bed and breakfast that serves as a wedding venue, a photographer, and a florist could all save money by splitting the bill and running an ad featuring all three businesses in the local newspaper.

2. Keep a tight rein on travel and entertainment expenses.

Have a clear policy and budget for these expenses. Under some circumstances, it might make sense to hold business meetings that involve treating clients to lunch or dinner, but be judicious in determining when that’s necessary. Wining and dining costs can add up quickly when no guidelines or boundaries are in place.

3. Reduce the need for office space by having a virtual team.

As your business grows and you need to add headcount to your team, consider allowing employees to work remotely. This can help you avoid needing to lease or buy a larger office space, and it will help you reduce the costs of office supplies and utilities, as well.

4. Be selective about the memberships and subscriptions you maintain.

Besides the challenges of finding the time to participate in multiple networking groups and professional organizations, the membership fees can put a strain on your budget. Strategically choose the organizations you join by considering whether they provide ample opportunity to build relationships with your target customers and whether they are necessary for your professional reputation.

For example, the owner of a tour company would likely benefit immensely from a membership to the local visitor bureau whereas professional organizations not focused on the travel and tourism industry might not offer as much return on investment.

5. Pay the annual fee rather than on a monthly basis for cloud-based software.

Even though the lump sum annual cost may sound like a lot of money compared to the monthly fee for online software programs, paying for a year upfront can often save an appreciable amount of dollars over time.

For example, a subscription to Evernote Plus costs $3.99 per month with the month-to-month plan and the equivalent of only $2.92 per month by paying $34.99 for the annual plan—a savings of 27 percent.* Similarly, Hootsuite offers its Professional subscription for $14.99 per month, or you can choose to pay for an annual subscription for $119.88, which is the equivalent of $9.98 per month—a 33 percent savings.*

By switching from month-to-month plans to annual subscriptions for several or all of the software solutions you’re using, you may discover you’ll cut costs considerably.

6. Collaborate by phone and email when it can be just as effective as meeting face-to-face meeting.

With the high price of gasoline, it makes good economic sense to reduce how much you drive. While some business dealings require face-to-face interaction, many collaborative efforts can be accomplished through a phone call or email. When appropriate, suggest that you talk with customers and project partners via phone or exchange information through email. You might find that they, too, would rather converse that way. Not only does cutting back on driving decrease your mileage costs, but it also saves valuable time and wear and tear on your vehicle.

7. Leverage rewards programs.

Take advantage of free rewards programs that retailers, your credit card, airlines, and other businesses offer. From office supplies to business furnishings to discounted airfare to cash back, these programs enable you to get exclusive deals, rebates, and other incentives that can save your business money.

Where to Turn for More Tips on Running a Profitable Business

For more insight into how to manage your business’s overhead costs, contact a SCORE mentor for guidance. With experience in all aspects of starting and running a small business, our mentors can help you objectively review your spending and brainstorm ways to run a more profitable company.

*According to the company’s website on 8/30/2018

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Time for Your Business End-of-Summer Checkup

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With the end of summer closing in and fall just around the corner, now is a perfect time to pause for a moment and assess what’s working and what isn’t for your business. Although most of the year is behind you, you still have time to make adjustments that could save costs, drive more revenue, and improve profitability for 2016.

Time for a Small Business Checkup

By performing this end-of-summer checkup, you’ll assess where you might have fallen behind, so you can take action and get your business back on track this fall and winter.

 

  1. Evaluate your sales efforts. If you’re behind on revenue, it might be because you aren’t reaching out to as many prospects as you need to, or you might not fully understand the needs of your potential customers. No one ever said selling is easy. It’s hard work and it demands a willingness to recognize, accept, and fix weaknesses in the sales process.

 

  1. Review marketing tactics and initiatives. Look carefully at the collateral you’re presenting to customers, the marketing channels you’re using, and the brand message you’re communicating. Is your brand image consistent across all fronts? Are you seeing results in the way of brand awareness and revenue generation from your tactics and strategies? Review and assess how your website, social media, and print marketing materials are performing, so you can identify where you need to make changes.

 

  1. Improve customer relationship nurturing. Customers who feel they’re appreciated and wanted will always be more likely to stay for the long term. By making customers understand that they truly matter, you increase loyalty and satisfaction. A stellar customer experience drives existing clients to buy more—and it prompts them to happily refer others to your business. If you haven’t been making an effort to nurture your customer relationships through post-order phone calls or emails, periodic check-ins to ensure they’re happy with your services, updates about what’s new and exciting, and other efforts—it’s time to start.

 

  1. Find ways to streamline operational and administrative processes. Wasted time prevents businesses from growing to their potential. When excessive paperwork, duplicated work, and inefficient systems slow processes down rather than improve productivity, you need to find a better way. Carefully look at the various systems and processes (such as accounting software, project management apps, customer data management, lead generation, etc.) you use in your business and look for ways to streamline activities and save time.

 

  1. Evaluate expense habits. Your business’s spending habits directly affect your bottom line. While it’s important to stay on top of your expenses year-round, it’s especially critical as the year is winding down. If your profit and loss statement doesn’t look as favorable as you had hoped it would by now, dig into what you’re spending money on and identify what you might cut back on.

 

With the kids back to school and summer vacations now just memories, now is the time to get back to business and back on track to reaching your goals. By doing an end-of-summer checkup, you’ll have a head start in finishing strong when the year is at its end.

If you need guidance to help you keep your business on the path to success, contact SCORE about our free mentoring. Our mentors have knowledge of every aspect involved in starting and running a small business. 

 

6 New Year’s Resolutions for Small Business Profitability

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Succeeding in small business requires constant attention to detail and a willingness to adapt along the way. With a new year upon us, what better time to aspire to make your small business more profitable than ever before?

 

How can you get there? Here are six steps to put you on the right path.

 

  1. Evaluate your processes and systems and identify which are providing efficiency and which are holding back your productivity.

Specifically consider replacing manual processes that consume a lot of time with solutions that can automate them and that integrate with the systems your business uses. Accounting, sales, marketing, etc…where can you find efficiencies?

 

  1. Take a close look at your expenses.

Go line by line on your expense report and ask yourself what’s necessary and what is not. What’s driving up your business costs but not giving you a return on your dollars? Be honest, and consider kicking “nice to have” but unnecessary expenses to the curb in the New Year.

 

  1. Assess your pricing.

If you’ve grandfathered clients into rates from years gone by, it may be time for an increase. If you decide to raise your rates, make sure you’re providing enough advance notice to your clients (review the contracts you have in place!) and provide an explanation as to why you’re increasing pricing. And of course, thank them for their understanding and for the continued opportunity to work with them.

 

  1. Remain objective.

As the year begins and moves forward, question yourself and those you work with (employees, vendors, project partners, etc.) when things aren’t progressing as you had hoped. Are your expectations too high? Do team members have too much on their plates? Are those involved not pulling their own weight? Do your products and services need improvement? These are tough questions that need to be asked and answered honestly for you to gain an understanding of what you can do better to improve your business results.

 

  1. Take action

After figuring out what changes could benefit your business’s bottom line, you’ll need to make a plan and follow through on executing it. Write it down, breaking it down into clear, actionable steps and tasks. Then, share those action items with those you’ll depend on to help you succeed.

 

  1. Take responsibility.

As the owner of your business, change starts with you. Take responsibility and set a positive example for others to follow. By demonstrating enthusiasm and dependability, you’ll facilitate a company atmosphere that has a firm foundation of cooperation and accountability.

 

If you need guidance in making 2016 the best year yet for your small business, contact us at Portland Maine SCORE. Our certified mentors are knowledgeable about all aspects involved in starting and running a business.